Baltimore City Department of Housing & Community Development Names Developer for Revitalization of 38 Vacant City-Owned Properties

The Baltimore City Department of Housing & Community Development (DHCD) announced today that Upton Renaissance, LLC, has been granted the development rights for 38 city-owned properties in Historic Upton.  The announcement was made today on the 800 block of Harlem Avenue, the site of 28 of the vacant buildings.  The additional 10 homes to be renovated are on the 800 block of Edmondson Avenue.

“Following an extensive Request for Proposals process, Upton Renaissance LLC, has been granted the development rights for these 38 city-owned properties,” said Baltimore City DHCD Commissioner Michael Braverman.  “This project in Historic Upton meets our goals of both addressing blight and revitalizing these beautiful and historically significant blocks that can act as anchors for future redevelopment efforts.”

Upton Renaissance, LLC, is a team of experienced developers including Tower Hill Harrison Development, Parris Development and Stanton View Development.  Their winning proposal includes a total development costs of approximately $8 million for the development of single-family homeownership opportunities.

Secretary Kenneth Holt from the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development spoke about the State’s support of this effort through Governor Larry Hogan’s Project C.O.R.E. initiative.  Project C.O.R.E., or Creating Opportunities for Renewal and Enterprise, is a multi-year partnership between the State of Maryland and the City of Baltimore to demolish, deconstruct or stabilize vacant and derelict buildings in Baltimore and replace them with green space, residential or commercial use projects, parks and other redevelopment that serves the needs of the community.

 "I am proud the State of Maryland is partnering with Baltimore City and local stakeholders to increase homeownership opportunities in the Upton neighborhood," said Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Secretary Kenneth C. Holt. "Through Project C.O.R.E. we are fundamentally transforming communities all across Baltimore and building a brighter future for the city and its residents."

The Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development is providing $1 million to stabilize the units as part of an overall investment of nearly $9.7 million.

The revitalization of these 38 homes builds upon ongoing state and city investment to create homeownership and support revitalization in Upton and Druid Heights, two historic West Baltimore communities that, along with Penn North, have combined to form the new West Baltimore Gateway Alliance. These communities are also within the Baltimore City DHCD targeted West Impact Investment Area – areas the City has identified as located strategically near anchor institutions, major redevelopments and/or strong markets which are poised for near-term transformative growth. 

 “We are grateful for the state’s support, not only in this area, but throughout Baltimore city,” said Ex Officio Mayor Bernard “Jack” Young.  “This is a partnership that is helping us strengthen and rebuild and with this collaboration, we can accelerate our community development goals and objectives.”

“The 800 blocks of Edmondson Ave and Harlem Ave present an incredible opportunity for Heritage Crossing and Upton,” said Councilman Eric Costello.  “We finally have a viable plan in place to move these two critical blocks forward.  Baltimore City DHCD has selected a development team committed to not work with our community, but to drive community development in Central West Baltimore and deliver results.”

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